0 Discovering China   Chinese Gardens Celebrated in ArtFor centuries, the traditional Chinese garden has been an idyllic paradise and a source of creative inspiration for scholars and artists.

In traditional Chinese culture, the garden is a place to discover one self. The garden serves as a place for self-cultivation, solitary contemplation, as well as for social or literary gatherings.

For the first time, the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art displays its entire permanent collection of artwork celebrating these recurring themes in Chinese gardens.

[Mike Hearn, Met Museum Asian Art Department Head]:
“It introduces one thousand years of Chinese painting history, all focused on the theme of Chinese gardens, and how gardens have been an inspiration for artists throughout the centuries.”

“Chinese Gardens—Pavilions, Studios, Retreats” features over 60 paintings—together with ceramics, carved bamboo, lacquer ware, metalwork, textiles, and photographs.

Met Museum Asian Art Department Head and curator of the exhibition, Mike Hearn talks about the key themes and elements in Chinese gardens.

[Mike Hearn, Met Museum Asian Art Department Head]:
“They initially were built to attract immortals. Immortals are another theme that percolates throughout garden history, as well as pavilions, which are always the focal point in gardens. Either you built a pavilion at a beautiful spot for the view or it became itself part of the view.”

One of the highlights of the exhibition is “The Palace of Nine Perfections” by a 17th century artist. The splendor of the traditional Chinese garden is set in 12 hanging scrolls, presenting an imaginary landscape of a seventh-century palace.

[Mike Hearn, Met Museum Asian Art Department Head]:
“In 1689, the city of Yangzhou welcomed the Kangxi emperor on his second Southern Inspection Tour…this painting actually is a representation of how well the Yangzhou society entertained the emperor on his arrival.”

The imperial garden is a source of inspiration of imaginary creations of what an immortal’s dwelling place would look like.

[Mike Hearn, Met Museum Asian Art Department Head]:
“These gardens were often meant to evoke paradises. So this wonderful 18-foot wide panoramic of a Tang Dynasty garden was so vast that the emperor had to ride on horseback between different pavilions.”

Hearn talks about retreat—a recurring theme in Chinese garden art.

[Mike Hearn, Met Museum Asian Art Department Head]:
“Reclusion, withdrawal from politics and the dusty world of commerce is a major theme. So we have a number of images that talk about, illustrates the idea of withdrawal into the landscapes, escaping either changing dynasties or commercial pressures.”

He elaborates this theme with the bottle imagery.

[Mike Hearn, Met Museum Asian Art Department Head]:
“The bottle was a metaphor for a world you could escape into. You can make yourself small, go into a bottle, or go into a gourd, and find another universe there.”

The Chinese character for bottle looks like a Han Dynasty bottle with a lid on it. Hearn explains how this becomes a way to find immortal happiness for the Taoist painter whose nickname was square bottle.

Every art piece tells a story—like the “Palace Banquet.” This is a hanging scroll in ink and color on silk, dating back to the late 10th–11th century.

The painting depicts a narrative sequence of the rendezvous between Emperor Xuanzong of the Tang Dynasty and his imperial consort Yang Guifei.

[Mike Hearn, Met Museum Asian Art Department Head]:
“The sad ending of the story is that so infatuated was the emperor with Yang Guifei that he neglected the affairs of the state. And An Lushan rebelled, forcing the emperor to flee. The palace guard refused to take the emperor to safety unless they put Yang Guifei to death.”

Hearn explains the message behind the story in the painting.

[Mike Hearn, Met Museum Asian Art Department Head]:
“It reminds you to not be distracted, too distracted by what surrounds you or the state will come to harm and ultimately the dynasty may fall.”

Another recurring theme focuses on how gardens serve a venue for literary gatherings. This is best illustrated in the “Gathering at the Orchid Pavilion”—a hand scroll in ink and color on paper.

It tells the story of the well-known calligrapher Wang Xizhi and his friends meeting at the Orchid Pavilion to hold a poetry competition. Cups of wine float downstream, as poets composed their verses by the meandering river.

[Mike Hearn, Met Museum Asian Art Department Head]:
“The legend of this extraordinary outdoor gathering was a inspiration for later garden designers who often love to create these winding waterways.”

Till January 6th, 2013, Chinese Art lovers will be able to feast their eyes on this collection of “Chinese Gardens—Pavilions, Studios, Retreats” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

By Margaret Trey, PhD

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0 The China Project   Queensland Gallery of Modern ArtQueenslands Gallery of Modern Art presents The China Project, a three-part display that considers contemporary Chinese Art practice.

In this video, Nicholas Ngs delightful soundtrack accompanies Russell Storer as he gives us an insight into the beauty and relevance of the China Project Exhibition.

Follow the Sun to Brisbane’s winter events and attractions at http://www.brisbaneinwinter.com.au

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0 Sugar Art made by master craftsman from ChinaWatch this talented & skillful craftsman wooing the crowds with his beautifully intricate creations. These candies are definitely too pretty to be eaten!!

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0 China Glaze Tronica (#1) Water Marble Nail Art Tutorial(& yes, since this is #1 that does mean there will be #2, I already have picked which other colors I want to use!) More Pics can be seen in this blog post: http://mysimplelittlepleasures.blogspot.com/2011/03/notd-tronica-water-marble-1-matte-magic.html

Nail polish used:
Wet ‘n’ Wild French White
China Glaze Hyper Haute
China Glaze Hologram
China Glaze Techno Teal
China Glaze Virtual Violet

Tips & Tricks Playlist (taping tutorial, how to clean-up & more):

http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=4B6CE9EFF85ED1C1

Water Marble Tutorials Playlist:

http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=9897F44C750F9766

Nail Art Tutorials Playlist:

http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=B91C3B3D94F76FDB

You can check out the My Simple Little Pleasures Facebook page here:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/My-Simple-Little-Pleasures/119041034826219

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0 Modern Chinese Painter   宋文治 Song Wenzhi (part 1)http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&source=hp&q=%E5%AE%8B%E6%96%87%E6%B2%BB&gbv=2&aq=f&oq=&aqi=

http://www.art-virtue.com/painting/history/1900/index.htm

Song Wenzhi (1919-1999, Taicang, Jiangsu Province) studied advertising art in Shanghai when he was young. Later he became a student of Wu Hufan ( 吳湖帆 ), a master of Chinese calligraphy and painting and a renowned connoisseur and collector.

After having studied at the Suzhou Art Training Institute, he taught at secondary schools and normal universities. He joined the Jiangsu Province Traditional Chinese Painting Studio in 1957. Song Wenzhi studied classical Chinese painting techniques of the Four Wangs ( 四王 王時敏、王鑒、王原祁、王翬 ), Western perspectives and color theories, and paintings of Picasso, Monet, Van Gogh, and etc.

Song was a director of the Chinese Artists Association, and a vice-chairman of its Jiangsu Branch. Many of his works have been included in international collections.

Sources:
Important Art of New China 1949-1979 (China Guardian Auction Catalogue 1997, Beijing)
Chen Lusheng, Xin Zhongguo meishu tushi – 1949-1966 [The Art History of the People's Republic of China - 1949-1966] (Beijing: Zhongguo qingnian chubanshe, 2000) [in Chinese]
Michael Sullivan, Modern Chinese Artists — A Biographical Dictionary (Berkeley, etc: University of California Press, 2006)
Zhongguo meishuguan (ed.), 中国美术年鉴 1949-1989 (Guilin: Guangxi meishu chubanshe, 1993)

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Early China The Han Dynasty Lady Dai

On June 18, 2012, in Chinese Art, by admin

0 Early China The Han Dynasty Lady DaiOhlone College Art 103A
Professor Kenney Mencher
(Art History Stone Age Technology through the Early Renaissance)
www.kenney-mencher.com

An analysis of the items found in Lady Dai’s tomb from the Han Dynasty with an in depth analysis of the silk banner found draped across her coffin.

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0 Chinas Most Popular Artist on the Web   Hai Sheng Wang 王海胜China Most Web Popularity Artist 2010 – Hai Sheng Wang

Leading International Art Competition Winner, Art Horizon, 1988, New York City

Former Canadian Artist Representation (CARFAC) Provincial Delegate of Alberta

www.haishengwang.com

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Linda Gallery Contemporary Chinese Art

On May 22, 2012, in Chinese Art, by admin

0 Linda Gallery Contemporary Chinese ArtLinda Gallery, established in 1990, specialises in contemporary Chinese Art and Indonesian paintings. Being an active player in the industry for more than a decade, the gallery has held numerous exhibitions, featuring works by famous Chinese Contemporary artists, Indonesian maestros, Indo–European artists, as well as other South East Asian artists.

The gallery is dedicated to the promotion of contemporary visual art. With a network of 3 galleries and 1 museum in key cities of Asia, we aim to bring arts beyond the boundaries of nation and culture and expose our clients to different varieties of works. We are actively positioning the gallery as one of the leading galleries in the region.

*We will be having an exhibition on the 7th of July 2007 on Yan Bo’s works.

Please visit us at www.lindagallery.com

Thank you very much

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Chinese Artist Disappears

On May 17, 2012, in Chinese Art, by admin

0 Chinese Artist DisappearsMeet Chinese performance artist Liu Bolin…also known as ‘the invisible man’.

Where else to find Diagonal View…

FOLLOW us on Twitter: http://ow.ly/3FM14
or
LIKE us on Facebook:

http://ow.ly/3FLUg

Strange talents, shocking stories, dangerous stunts…see it all here @
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=89F56B543AEF7077

Duration : 0:1:3

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