our hyperthryroid cat has issues with loose stool and alot of it..vet suggested Hill’s I.D..but in reading the ingredients, the first one is chicken by-product, third is corn gluten meal..I thought these ingredients were for cheaper, store brand cat food..She was on Purina Pro plan, which at least, the first ingredient is chicken!

Would someone please recommend an alternative to this..Her stools have gotten a little better but not much…Thanks..Loree and Jade

Cat poo is one thing I’ve learned a lot about! Poppy had loose stool for the first two years of her life. The substandard vet I saw never found anything wrong with her.

This, and her weight problem, started me on my quest which led me to learn about proper cat nutrition.

You’re absolutely correct that the Hills is garbage. Cats with "sensitive systems" most often react to the grains in the food, with corn, wheat and soy being the most common.

I believe that there’s a good chance you’ll solve her problems if you simply switch her to a good quality canned food. Or even a grainless dry food.

Poppy is a good example of this. After switching her to an all canned diet, her stool consistency improved immensely. And now that she’s eating raw, you could bounce a quarter off those things. If you should ever want to bounce a quarter off of cat poop, which would be pretty weird. But I guarantee they’d bounce!

From my blog:
DIGESTIVE UPSETS IN CATS

Digestive upsets can take more than one form and of course may have more than one cause.

One symptom is vomiting and the other is loose stool or diarrhea. And then there’s farting.

Diarrhea is much more serious and a cat suffering from it should always be checked by a vet asap.

In cases of loose stool, a sample should be taken to the vet to rule out any parasites or conditions. Assuming there is none, then you have to look to the diet.

Ditto for vomiting. Excessive hairballs can often be dealt with by daily grooming. I’m not a big fan of supplementing for hairballs – I think the cause should be dealt with not just the symptoms. And I would never feed a hairball control food for the same reason, and because excess fiber isn’t necessarily a good thing. UPDATE: My vet mentioned that fish oil may be of help with hairballs. I forget why, but I think she said it helps break them down, or aids in their digestion….either way, it’s a good thing to add to the diet as it will also help skin and coat. It has an anti-inflammatory effect which may aid digestion as well.

But once you’ve ruled out diseases or parasites, the most likely culprit is diet. Crappy foods contain ingredients that many cats are unable to tolerate. But even some very good foods can disagree with a cat, either "just because" or perhaps because they’ve been switched to it too quickly. Or perhaps a particular protein source disagrees with the cat. UPDATE: My vet recommends the use of digestive enzymes when feeding foods that are higher in carbs. This will help the cat to digest them properly. They’re not as necessary if you’re feeding grainless foods.

Again, the solution in most cases is going to be to switch to another, perhaps better food. It does have to be done slowly, and you may have to try more than one food, but the results are worth it.

If it seems that you’ve tried every possible food and have been very patient in switching the cat to the new food, you might consider supplements. These include slippery elm or probiotics. I personally suggest Jarrow’s Pet-Dophilus as a good probiotic. UPDATE: When you begin pro-b’s, you may not notice an immediate improvement. Poppy actually got gas when I started her on them. My vet’s recommendation is to not give them everyday – perhaps 2-3 times per week or every other day. Also, once you’ve finished a bottle, buy another brand. Variety is good here. And don’t buy pro-b’s for humans. It’s not bad, it’s just not the right stuff for them.

Slippery Elm can be used (if you know what you’re doing) for constipation, diarrhea and loose stool – it’s sovereign, in or out, and is not harmful – although it should not be given at the same time as any other medications because it tends to dilute their effects. It’s considered to be a demulcent which affects water balance in the digestive system.

 

8 Responses to Hill’s I.D. Feline.same ingredients as store brand. I don’t see a difference in ingredients….in my cats stoo

  1. TKS says:

    Yes, they aren’t the first choice in ingredients but it is formulated to be easy on the digestive tract. If it helps, it may be a good choice for her.
    References :

  2. Voss Man says:

    if you don’t like that vets recommendation try another vet
    References :

  3. rrm38 says:

    Try a grain free food. Innova EVO and Wellness Core are two excellent examples. My senior guy with hyperthyroid fared very well on the EVO, and was having loose stools prior to going on it. If your cat is on meds such as Methimazole for the hyperthyroid, it could be that his dosage needs to be tweaked a little before her system straightens out. It took several dosage tweaks before we finally got it right right for Hobbes. Your vet should be able to guide you in the right direction with that. Good luck, and I hope she starts to feel better soon!
    References :

  4. Ken says:

    Both foods the hills and the purina you feed before are poure garbage. You know your cat is a carnivore and has no use for grains. Do you know what by prodicts are? corn?
    The thing is, the thyroid will nee to be a bit better controlled for you to see an improvement in food. You should get some acidoupholous from a health food store and sprinkle some over the food each time you feed, Now, Nutrtion
    Nutrition since there are so many bad things out there is very important to your cat’s health
    Contrary to what you may have heard; dry foods are not a great thing to feed a cat.
    Please read the label on what you are feeding? What are the ingredients? Do you know what they mean? Is the first ingredient a muscle meat like chicken or is it meal or other things? Learn what meal and other things mean here.
    http://www.catinfo.org/#Learn_How_To_Rea

    Dry foods are the number 1 cause of diabetes in cats as well as being a huge contributing factor to kidney disease, obesity, crystals, u.t.i’s and a host of other problems. Food allergies are very common when feeding dry foods. Rashes, scabs behind the tail and on the chin are all symptoms of food allergies probably from the grains. Constipation? Dry food, not enough moisture. Blockages? Again not enough moisture in the food and you are risking something serious. People on this board say feed fiber but this is a cat not a dog and cats are obligate carnivores unlike dogs an they don’t eat cereal and don’t need fiber.
    The problems associated with Dry food is that they are loaded with carbohydrates which many cats (carnivores) cannot process. Also, Most of the moisture a cat needs is suppose to be in the food (Cats are not naturally big drinkers) but in
    Dry, 95% of it is zapped out of dry foods in the processing. Another thing, most use horrible ingredients and don’t use a muscle meat as the primary ingredient and use vegetable based protein versus animal. Not good for an animal that has to eat meat to survive.
    You want to pick a canned food w/o gravy (gravy=carbs) that uses a muscle meat as the first ingredient and doesn’t have corn at all or grains at least in the first 3 ingredients if at all. Fancy feast is a middle grade food as it uses a muscle meat as the first ingrediant. 9lives, friskies whiskas are lower grade canned but still better then dry and wellness and merrick upper grade human quality foods.
    Many foods are not mentioned here but if you read the labels you wiull know if it is qualaty. The price offers no guideline.
    The optimum food to feed cats has no grains whatsoever, cats have no use for them and many have trouble processing them as well as the carbs. IBD is another disease that is rapidly becoming common amoung cats because of the inappropriate diets being fed.
    Also, dry food is not proven to be better for teeth. Does a hard pretzel clean your teeth or do pieces of it get stuck? Why do people constantly repeat this old wives tale and put teeth over the organs like the kidneys?? (I have no clue) http://www.felinefuture.com/nutrition/bp

    Please read about cat nutrition.
    http://www.newdestiny.us/nutritionbasics
    http://www.catinfo.org/feline_obesity.ht
    http://maxshouse.com/feline_nutrition.ht
    References :

  5. J C says:

    Hill’s may be a prescription food, but it’s really prescription junk food, as you see from reading the ingredients. Given that many cats cannot tolerate corn I can’t see why these diets have corn or corn gluten in them ….

    In any case, I’ve fostered a few cats with IBD or other sensitive stomach issues, and have had a lot of success with feeding them either Innova’s EVO and/or California Natural Chicken and Rice. Might be worth a try for you and Jade.

    My current foster cat is hyperthyroid – we had to back off of her tapizole dosage a bit. She was having very loose stool on the optimal dose. Her thyroid numbers are just a tad higher than the vet would like, but she’s gaining weight and looks great, so we have achieved the balance between the tapizole dose, and chronic diarrhea.
    References :
    Many years of cat rescue

  6. Jessica says:

    I think Hills has a contract with vets or something. I was always told it was good too, but when you research what a cat needs, than look at foods, you see it is junk. Merrick, Purina Pro-Plan, Innova, Nutro Natural Choice, Spot’s Stew… These are all good. The more ‘Meat’ ingredients and the higher on the list of ingredients the better. If you were already on Pro-Plan, switch the the digestive formula of that. It will be easier on kitty’s stomach, and is a good food. Personally, I adore Merrick, and so do my cats. Nature’s Promise is also great. I like Spot’s Stew, they really didn’t, and it is over priced.
    References :
    Personal experience, Vet, Worked at Petco and PetSmart

  7. Lady Ariana says:

    I would suggest a grain free kibble – they are mostly sold in specialty pet stores or feed stores. The employees at those stores will definitely know more about the various ones they sell and will be better able to help you to choose what’s best for your cat. That said, here’s a short list of brands I recommend –

    Innova-EVO (expensive, but the best I know of)
    Nature’s Variety Instinct (comparable to EVO)
    Taste of the Wild (a good $10 less in our area than the first 2)
    Blue Buffalo (can’t remember if this is grain free or whole grain)

    You can feed a whole grain, like Felidae, and it’s still much better than the store brands or even Science Diet.

    One thing I suggest – the grain free is so much higher in protein than the food you have your cat on now, I suggest moving up to a whole grain food first, letting her adjust to the higher protein, and then move up to the grain free. Some animals simply cannot tolerate the "richness" of the grain free and have to remain on whole grain, so working up slowly might help your cat’s system adjust to it better.

    Also, while I am not sure what supplements to add, you could try asking at your local natural food store if they can suggest any supplements to add for your cat for her hypothyroidism – or even ask the employees at the specialty pet food store if you can as they may also know.

    Hope this helps.
    References :

  8. RuneAmok cats.com says:

    Cat poo is one thing I’ve learned a lot about! Poppy had loose stool for the first two years of her life. The substandard vet I saw never found anything wrong with her.

    This, and her weight problem, started me on my quest which led me to learn about proper cat nutrition.

    You’re absolutely correct that the Hills is garbage. Cats with "sensitive systems" most often react to the grains in the food, with corn, wheat and soy being the most common.

    I believe that there’s a good chance you’ll solve her problems if you simply switch her to a good quality canned food. Or even a grainless dry food.

    Poppy is a good example of this. After switching her to an all canned diet, her stool consistency improved immensely. And now that she’s eating raw, you could bounce a quarter off those things. If you should ever want to bounce a quarter off of cat poop, which would be pretty weird. But I guarantee they’d bounce!

    From my blog:
    DIGESTIVE UPSETS IN CATS

    Digestive upsets can take more than one form and of course may have more than one cause.

    One symptom is vomiting and the other is loose stool or diarrhea. And then there’s farting.

    Diarrhea is much more serious and a cat suffering from it should always be checked by a vet asap.

    In cases of loose stool, a sample should be taken to the vet to rule out any parasites or conditions. Assuming there is none, then you have to look to the diet.

    Ditto for vomiting. Excessive hairballs can often be dealt with by daily grooming. I’m not a big fan of supplementing for hairballs – I think the cause should be dealt with not just the symptoms. And I would never feed a hairball control food for the same reason, and because excess fiber isn’t necessarily a good thing. UPDATE: My vet mentioned that fish oil may be of help with hairballs. I forget why, but I think she said it helps break them down, or aids in their digestion….either way, it’s a good thing to add to the diet as it will also help skin and coat. It has an anti-inflammatory effect which may aid digestion as well.

    But once you’ve ruled out diseases or parasites, the most likely culprit is diet. Crappy foods contain ingredients that many cats are unable to tolerate. But even some very good foods can disagree with a cat, either "just because" or perhaps because they’ve been switched to it too quickly. Or perhaps a particular protein source disagrees with the cat. UPDATE: My vet recommends the use of digestive enzymes when feeding foods that are higher in carbs. This will help the cat to digest them properly. They’re not as necessary if you’re feeding grainless foods.

    Again, the solution in most cases is going to be to switch to another, perhaps better food. It does have to be done slowly, and you may have to try more than one food, but the results are worth it.

    If it seems that you’ve tried every possible food and have been very patient in switching the cat to the new food, you might consider supplements. These include slippery elm or probiotics. I personally suggest Jarrow’s Pet-Dophilus as a good probiotic. UPDATE: When you begin pro-b’s, you may not notice an immediate improvement. Poppy actually got gas when I started her on them. My vet’s recommendation is to not give them everyday – perhaps 2-3 times per week or every other day. Also, once you’ve finished a bottle, buy another brand. Variety is good here. And don’t buy pro-b’s for humans. It’s not bad, it’s just not the right stuff for them.

    Slippery Elm can be used (if you know what you’re doing) for constipation, diarrhea and loose stool – it’s sovereign, in or out, and is not harmful – although it should not be given at the same time as any other medications because it tends to dilute their effects. It’s considered to be a demulcent which affects water balance in the digestive system.
    References :
    http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=constipate
    http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=fiberfacts
    http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=foodallerg
    http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=nutritiona
    http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=probiotics
    http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=slipperyelm
    http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=switchingf
    What to feed:
    http://www.catinfo.org/commercialcannedfoods.htm
    Food Allergies: http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=foodallerg
    The best of the worst – dry foods: My personal picks are Wellness Core, Innova Evo or Nature’s Variety Instincts. I agree with some of the foods listed here but not all. I am happy to review ingredient lists if requested:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *