I’m trying to answer a couple questions, but it seems vague.
Anyone have a simple and generalized answer to:
What was the role of Art in Chinese society before 1279?

"China’s highly developed material culture stretches back as early as the 7th millennium BC, when Neolithic (c. 6500–1600 BC) potters created forms and decorative schemes that would recur throughout the long continuity of Chinese Art. The succeeding Bronze Age art of the Shang (c. 1600–c. 1050 BC) and Zhou (c. 1050–256 BC) periods, mostly in the form of cast bronze vessels and carved jades, developed those early decorative schemes into ritual items and potent motifs and carried the craft of bronze-casting, in particular, to the highest levels of technical sophistication. Even in these early periods, calligraphy, in the form of inscriptions on bronze ritual vessels and on oracle bones, played an integral part in Chinese ritual and art. Calligraphers and painters came into their own with the introduction of brush and ink, using composition, line and brushwork to express the emotions of the human spirit, as well as to record narratives of history and religion. Along with the art of poetry, painting and calligraphy were to become the most highly valued of the arts of China."

"China produced an impressive corpus of writings on the theory of literature, music, calligraphy and painting, and antiquarian studies. There are two major strands in the skein of these writings: a moralizing Confucian one, according to which art serves to communicate a message beneficial to human society; and a Daoist one, according to which the Dao of nature is expressed through the medium of the artist who has prepared himself to transmit it without conscious effort. "

The passages above are copy/pasted from an article found in the database Oxford Art Online. Check out your local college library website for access to this database or open a chat with a librarian near you to investigate further.

Chat services:
http://www.askus247.org/
http://www.askalibrarian.org/
http://www.library.ucla.edu/questions/index.cfm
http://cms.imperial.edu/index.php?pid=3118

 

One Response to What was the purpose of Art in Chinese Society before 1279?

  1. pj says:

    "China’s highly developed material culture stretches back as early as the 7th millennium BC, when Neolithic (c. 6500–1600 BC) potters created forms and decorative schemes that would recur throughout the long continuity of Chinese art. The succeeding Bronze Age art of the Shang (c. 1600–c. 1050 BC) and Zhou (c. 1050–256 BC) periods, mostly in the form of cast bronze vessels and carved jades, developed those early decorative schemes into ritual items and potent motifs and carried the craft of bronze-casting, in particular, to the highest levels of technical sophistication. Even in these early periods, calligraphy, in the form of inscriptions on bronze ritual vessels and on oracle bones, played an integral part in Chinese ritual and art. Calligraphers and painters came into their own with the introduction of brush and ink, using composition, line and brushwork to express the emotions of the human spirit, as well as to record narratives of history and religion. Along with the art of poetry, painting and calligraphy were to become the most highly valued of the arts of China."

    "China produced an impressive corpus of writings on the theory of literature, music, calligraphy and painting, and antiquarian studies. There are two major strands in the skein of these writings: a moralizing Confucian one, according to which art serves to communicate a message beneficial to human society; and a Daoist one, according to which the Dao of nature is expressed through the medium of the artist who has prepared himself to transmit it without conscious effort. "

    The passages above are copy/pasted from an article found in the database Oxford Art Online. Check out your local college library website for access to this database or open a chat with a librarian near you to investigate further.

    Chat services:
    http://www.askus247.org/
    http://www.askalibrarian.org/
    http://www.library.ucla.edu/questions/index.cfm
    http://cms.imperial.edu/index.php?pid=3118
    References :
    Find a library near you and ask! http://www.publiclibraries.com/university_library.htm

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *